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Where Are Nicanor's Gates in the Temple?

Updated: Aug 4, 2022



The doorway atop the fifteen semi-circular steps led into the Azarah. The first eleven cubits along the eastern side of the Azarah was called the Courtyard of the Israelites.

The gateway atop the fifteen steps that led into the Courtyard of the Israelites were called the Upper Gate, also known as the Nikanor Gate.


Each door was 5 cubits by 20 cubits. The brass was carved with intricate designs, and its finish was exceedingly bright. The doorway atop the fifteen semi-circular steps led into the Azarah. The first eleven cubits along the eastern side of the Azarah was called the Courtyard of the Israelites.


The gateway atop the fifteen steps that led into the Courtyard of the Israelites were called the Upper Gate, also known as the Nikanor Gate.

Nikanor was the benefactor who paid craftsmen in Alexandria, Egypt, to fashion the two large brass doors used for this gate.



Each door was 5 cubits by 20 cubits. The brass was carved with intricate designs, and its finish was exceedingly bright.

Nicanor had requested these doors were being sent by ship from Egypt to Judea, a storm broke out. The crew was forced to cast one of the two brass doors into the sea.


When the danger continued, the crew decided to toss the second gate out as well. Hearing their plans, Nikanor declared that if they throw out the door, they should throw him out as well. His self-sacrifice called for a miracle and the storm subsided. When the ship docked, the door cast overboard was miraculously found floating in the harbor.


All the Temple doors were plated with gold except the Nikanor gate. The rabbis wanted the people to see the "miracle doors" in their pristine form. Additionally, the brass finish had the appearance of fine gold.


The heavy doors required twenty men to open them. The Nikanor Gate was opened only on the Sabbath, festivals, and Rosh Chodesh. If the king was present in the Temple, the doors were also opened in his honor. On all other days, smaller gateways (to the left and right of Nikanor gate) were used.


Brought by Rabbi Moshe Perets

 

Rabbi Moshe Perets is the Founder and Executive Director of NoahideAcademy.org, the world’s largest Noahide informational website. He has established the Noahide Academy of Israel website under the non-profit organisation - אור לעמים - Light Unto the Nations since 2016. He accomplished his Rabbinical Studies at the Chabad Yeshiva of Brussels in 2011. He has a medical degree by the University of Louvain in Brussels as well a Masters in Biomedical Research by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has for the past years focused on Psychotherapy and developed a new approach: Deep Soul Therapy. He is a spiritual mentor, teacher, coach, and healer who has helped facilitate profound shifts for hundreds of people around the globe. His teaching activities at the Noahide Academy allowed students from all over the world to live passionate, purposeful lives, connect more intimately with G-d, and reveal the hidden light and power of their souls. Rabbi Moshe Perets lives currently in Israel with his wife and 5 children.


 

Used Sources

Chabad.org

 

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